Review: R.A. McColley – Trumpets Will Fill The Sky

Trumpets Will Fill The Sky, R.A. McColley’s first collection of verse and short stories, contemplates the human dilemmas of heart and spirit. McColley is blessed with the gift of rhyme as well as a keen ability to observe the effects of beauty and ignorance and inspire the reader to truly experience life. McColley is an artist who paints rare and exceptional portraits with his quill, and the content of his verses is highly relatable. While I enjoyed the entire collection, my favourite poems, due Trumpets Will Fill The Sky, R.A. McColley’s first collection of verse and short stories, contemplates the human dilemmas of heart and spirit. McColley is blessed with the gift of rhyme as well as a keen ability to observe the effects of beauty and ignorance and inspire the reader to truly experience life. McColley is an artist who paints rare and exceptional portraits with his quill, and the content of his verses is highly relatable. While I enjoyed the entire collection, my favourite poems, due to either content or his words’ visual images, were Still Waters “avoiding conflict daily finding peace within our hell, life is like an open ocean screaming from a shell”, The Joy of Sadness “sadness my dearest friend in solitude, a dear one of caring when I’m not in the mood, always to show me and never is rude, sweet song in life my darling brief interlude”, and Watercolor “I let the colors blur over the page, they drip off to the edges blending and bleeding, the brush moves water like filling the crevices.” I highly recommend this collection and am anxious for McColley’s forthcoming title. 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24714508-trumpets-will-fill-the-sky

The Girl With the Blue Umbrella – Heather Awad

Purchase and read this review at https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Blue-Umbrella-Heather-Awad-ebook/dp/B015JTDFFS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1468447762&sr=8-1&keywords=heather+awad

Find this  title at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26632018-the-girl-with-the-blue-umbrella

Find my review at https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/166634108

Being familiar with and adoring Heather’s poetry on Channillo, I quickly snagged a copy when I learned she also wrote a book. As a new poet, I’m so inspired by Heather’s gift for observation and free verse. It was refreshing to discover that good poetry doesn’t have to rhyme or have a sing-songy tempo. Heather paints beautiful vignettes that are so relatable to the reader. She has the unique ability to draw the reader in and take us with her on journeys, while enveloping us with warm hugs. Poems in The Girl With The Blue Umbrella will elicit smiles, pull on your heart strings, invoke childhood memories, and stretch your imagination. While I liked all of the poems, my particular favorites were Manner of Speech, where Heather uses metaphor and all five senses to liken attraction to the consumption of food, “the sound of his voice like food for the hungry air. Swallowing his words and devouring each spoken breath and delicious reverberation.. I simply cannot stop inhaling his every fragrant word”, Blues and Gold, where she uses metaphors of painting and fire to describe a relationship “where you begin and I end like paint belongs to canvas never will this hue diminish blues and gold surround us”, and the melancholy Blue Sky, “I can wake up tomorrow and it will be the next day farther from this one full of intrinsic belief that the sky inside my heart will be blue no matter what”. I’m eagerly anticipating her forthcoming title coming this fall. I’m honored to have read this collection and profoundly impacted by Heather’s gift for verse. Bravo!

Comagate Vol I, The Loops and Lies by Benjamin Michael Greene

Available for purchase at http://www.lulu.com/shop/benjamin-michael-greene/comagate-volume-i-the-loops-and-lies/hardcover/product-22730846.html

Find this author and this review on goodreads.com at  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14141143.Benjamin_Michael_Greene and https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25845076-comagate

 

Fall into the world of Comagate, purgatory for creative Minds, where inhabitants have one final chance to live dreams while awaiting Judgment or continue with “The Fall”. Benjamin Michael Greene’s debut title, whose depiction of purgatory is the product of a vivid imagination, rich in detail, with vivid/eloquent descriptions evoking all of the senses, and an impressive cast of characters. In my opinion, Comagate reads like a cross between science fiction/fantasy with a tiny sprinkle of Stephen King gore (The Teaparty of Kahnd L. Vik and Sugar Plum). Each chapter relates the story of a different character, while stories interweave. In the realm of Comagate, time is static, meaningless and different from what Minds experienced during life in the Origin (before Comagate). You’ll meet Chimey Sweep, Skosha, Nof (“Dreadlock Man”), Gerald the Green Chair, C-157, Passerbine the Beetle Maker, Sugar Plum, Kahnd L. Vik, Mr. Turtle, Cogsmith (“The Hammer”, Marjorie, Barkeley, Jottidun, Mimah, Olde King Cole, and Stitcher (returns Mind to the Origin), among others. Greene describes in vivid sensory detail various areas of Comagate, including Steamworks, Overlap (safe land “in-between” where people could live out the lives they desired, on the outskirts of Steamworks), bordered by Mining District on one side of Overlap, and Drafts (sole area of Comagate with green grass, meadows, trees, blue skies, and castles) on the other side of Overlap. My first favourite chapter is The Fall where Greene speaks directly to the reader describing what it will feel like. C-157, relates the story of C-157 who keeps watch over Comagate with its gigantic lens eye. “Sparks rained continually from its joints, illuminating the dark with dancing fireflies, while the dark acrid smoke of the burning metal belched towards the sky, thickening the depressive blanket that killed all life that was not designed by the Hammer.” 86 The World, relates Chimey Sweep’s journey through Drafts to patronize Stine’s Pub. With Greene’s tremendous gift for description, I could imagine vividly the Drafts as Chimey navigates, where “the forest was old. He could smell it. It was a dank, wet smell mixed with an earthy musk and the faint wisps of dark growth foliage. The canopy wasn’t particularly thick, as much of the sky could be seen, but the cloud covered sky kept any rays of sunlight to a maximum of zero.” I enjoyed this read and am anxiously awaiting Greene’s forthcoming title, as well as Comagate Volume II.